Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Top 15 Hitters: #13 Jake Jefferies

Jake Jefferies
6"2" 200 lbs DOB: 10/30/1987
Catcher
Bats: Left | Throws: Right
2009: Bowling Green
Acquired: 2008 Draft, 3rd Round, 78th Overall

Jake Jefferies spent most of the season splitting time between catching and designated hitter, sharing time behind the plate with Mike McCormick. After a solid debut with Hudson Valley in 2008, Jefferies' bat took a step back. While he remained tough to strike out, he hit only .261, didn't draw a ton of walks, and posted just a .359 slugging percentage. Behind the dish, Jefferies threw out about a quarter of attempted base-stealers.

Jefferies' calling card is his contact, so the .261 batting average is worrisome. His BABIP was .270, meaning he was probably a little bit unlucky, but not so much so that his year wasn't disappointing. In 238 at bats with the Renegades in 2008, he had 21 extra-base hits(16 doubles, three triples, and two homeruns). In 440 at bats with the Hot Rods in 2009, he had 26 extra-base hits(17 doubles, one triple, and eight homeruns).

Oddly enough, he hit for the exact same OPS against both lefties and righties(.243/.307/.379 vs. LHP and .267/.332/.353 vs. RHP). In either case, a .686 OPS isn't getting it done. His contact-oriented approach should lead to a higher batting average in 2010. He should open with the Charlotte Stone Crabs and could have the full-time catching gig for the first time in his pro career. He'll need to show a rebound in the batting average department to establish himself as a legitimate prospect, and advancements in patience, power, and defense would really move him up the list.

10 comments:

  1. dude is overrated

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  2. This seems pretty sobering to see him ranked this high after 2009. I'd like to see him live up to his billing and he may, but there was not much positive to take from 2009.

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  3. I realize that there can be individual adjustments for legit reasons, but I have trouble considering a player a prospect if he is over 19 in Rookie ball, over 20 in Low A, over 21 in High A, over 22 in AA, and over 23 in AAA. Does that sound about right?

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  4. I know that there can be individual adjustments for legit reasons, but I have trouble considering a player a prospect if he spends a full seasons in GCL and is over 17, over 18 in Appy, over 19 in NYPL, over 20 in Low A, over 21 in High A, over 22 in AA, and over 23 in AAA. Does that sound about right?

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  5. Sorry about the duplicate post, I didn't see it publish the first time and after I refreshed it once.

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  6. It's tough in the lower reaches of the minors for college guys. Getting assigned to short-season ball in his debut year and getting promoted to Bowling Green seems fine(his stats... not so much). As for the full-season thing, the Rays just about never promote guys out of low-A ball.

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  7. This kid can hit! Yeah last season wasn't good at the end probably something that nobody really knows but jake and his coaches. I'm looking for him to bounce back.

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  8. Amen! Bounce back is in order. He can definitely hit, if he gets more starts behind the plate, he will get in his groove.

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  9. Anonymous~ your rating system may work for those drafted out of high school, but in all fairness, it can't really be applied to college guys. Even Evan Longoria started out his pro career, with us, in the Hudson Valley -(low A short season.)Rarely, will TB start a player in long season ball.
    On to another topic~minor league games begin today...that is, if the rain goes/stays away.

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  10. This guy is a big time hitter. This will be a big year for hi.

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